Remember

The centenary of The Great War is now with us and the memories and stories of these times and the men and women of this dark time are now part of history.

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This blog tells the history of one young man whose life was changed by the war.

Maxwell Francis Reilly  MC Remembered.

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Joining Up

Maxwell Francis Reilly’s family originally came from Ireland but his home was Canada. In October 1914 he in service with 29th Vancouver Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. By May 1915 he had come to England. He was commissioned on 25th August 1915. Which he received from General sir Henry Lawson. Around 1st October 1916, he was promoted to Lieutenant and bound for the war in France with The Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment. (147 Infantry Brigade).

Active Service Military Cross

In the field, he was promoted again to an acting captain. He was awarded the Military Cross on 2nd April 1919. Published in The London Gazette supplement dated 9th December 1919 His citation read. “Lt. (A. /Capt.) Maxwell Francis Reilly, 1/7th Bn W.R.T.F. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during operations on 11th to 14th October 1918, East of Naves, in command of his company. His coolness and courage were at all times most inspiring to all ranks with him.”

Medical discharge

By December 1918 the prolonged conditions of trench warfare had taken its toll on his health and he was hospitalised and returned to a hospital in England, via  Calais and Dover On 10th July 1919. He was being treated in 3rd London General Hospital Wandsworth under the care of Major A.F.Voelcker. Maxwell attended a Medical board at The Royal Victoria Hospital Netley He was considered 50% disabled suffering from Nephritis and deafness to his right ear. The board concluded these conditions were attributed to active service. He had served for 5 years and 10 months when re relinquished his commission on 11th July 1920 on account of ill health. He was able to keep his rank of Captain. He was 34

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